Search for dissertations about: "CNS malaria"

Found 3 swedish dissertations containing the words CNS malaria.

  1. 1. Computerized rehabilitation for cognitive deficits after central nervous system malaria in Ugandan children

    University dissertation from Stockholm : Karolinska Institutet, Dept of Public Health Sciences

    Author : Paul Bangirana; Karolinska Institutet.; Karolinska Institutet.; [2011]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; CNS malaria;

    Abstract : Background: Malaria infecting the central nervous system (CNS) affects over 575,000 children annually in sub-Saharan Africa leading to cognitive deficits. The effect of this form of malaria on everyday behaviour and academic achievement has not been investigated in Uganda. READ MORE

  2. 2. Pharmacogenetic aspects of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria : emphasis on Ugandan population

    University dissertation from Stockholm : Karolinska Institutet, Dept of Laboratory Medicine

    Author : Jackson Kijumba B. Mukonzo; Karolinska Institutet.; Karolinska Institutet.; [2011]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES;

    Abstract : Infectious diseases such as HIV, tuberculosis and malaria are endemic in Africa and often require concomitant treatments that may result into subsequent drug–drug interactions. Inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs used in infectious diseases, as a result of genetic polymorphism, has been reported. READ MORE

  3. 3. Genetic Regulation of Neuroinflammation after Infection and Injury

    University dissertation from Stockholm : Karolinska Institutet, Dept of Clinical Neuroscience

    Author : Nada Omar Abdelmagid; Karolinska Institutet.; Karolinska Institutet.; [2012]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES;

    Abstract : Neuroinflammation is a common theme in a spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) diseases resulting in neuronal damage and degeneration. The exact mechanisms regulating inflammation in the CNS or its consequences in terms of nerve injury are still not known in detail. READ MORE