Search for dissertations about: "Carbon and nitrogen isotopes"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 21 swedish dissertations containing the words Carbon and nitrogen isotopes.

  1. 1. Perspectives from a human-centred archaeology : Iron Age people and society on Öland

    Author : Helene Wilhelmson; begravning och social identitet Gravarkeologiska forskargruppen – Död; []
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; Osteology; bioarchaeology; Iron Age; Scandinavia; 3D; digital; Image Based Modeling; GIS; isotopes; Oxygen; Strontium; Carbon; Nitrogen; trophic level effect; fractionation; chronology; network; Virtual Taphonomy; human-centred archaeology; mortographies; dietary shift; integration; immigration; diet; migration; violence; burial; Viking Age; Öland; island;

    Abstract : The objective of this study was to develop, test and evaluate a specifically defined interdisciplinary approach—the human-centred approach—as applied to a case study, Iron Age Öland. Four themes were selected to highlight different aspects of particular interest in Öland: taphonomy, diet, migration, and social organization. READ MORE

  2. 2. Quantity and quality of soil organic matter in permafrost terrain

    Author : Gustaf Hugelius; Peter Kuhry; Philip Wookey; Stockholms universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; carbon; soil organic matter; soil organic carbon; permafrost; arctic; upscaling; peat plateau; cryoturbation; active layer; thermokarst; carbon nitrogen ratio; stable isotopes; humification; Physical geography; Naturgeografi; geografi med naturgeografisk inriktning; Physical Geography;

    Abstract : High latitude terrestrial ecosystems are considered key components in the global carbon (C) cycle and hold large reservoirs of soil organic carbon (SOC). Much of this is stored as soil organic matter (SOM) in permafrost soils and peat deposits and is vulnerable to remobilization under future global warming. READ MORE

  3. 3. Norm and difference : Stone Age dietary practice in the Baltic region

    Author : Gunilla Eriksson; Kerstin Lidén; Birgit Arrhenius; Michael Richards; Stockholms universitet; []
    Keywords : HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; diet; norm; variation; Mesolithic; Neolithic; Sweden; Latvia; stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes; radiocarbon; reservoir effect; dogs; breastfeeding; gender; Archaeology subjects; Arkeologiämnen;

    Abstract : Stone Age research on Northern Europe frequently makes gross generalizations about the Mesolithic and Neolithic, although we still lack much basic knowledge on how the people lived. The transition from the Mesolithic to the Neolithic in Europe has been described as a radical shift from an economy dominated by marine resources to one solely dependent on farming. READ MORE

  4. 4. Varved lake sediments and diagenetic processes

    Author : Veronika Gälman; Ingemar Renberg; Daniel Conley; Umeå universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; Varved annually laminated lake sediment; diagenesis; varve appearance; iron; sulfur; chemical speciation; iron cycling; carbon; nitrogen; stabile isotopes; δ13C; δ15N; Earth sciences; Geovetenskap;

    Abstract : Varved (annually laminated) sediments are of great interest for inference of past environmental conditions, as they provide dated records with high time resolution. After deposition, the sediment varves are affected by diagenesis; i.e., chemical, physical and biological changes that occur within the sediment. READ MORE

  5. 5. Ecosystem functioning in streams : Disentangling the roles of biodiversity, stoichiometry, and anthropogenic drivers

    Author : André Frainer; Roland Jansson; Brendan McKie; Jonathan Benstead; Umeå universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; detrital food web; functional diversity; stoichiometry; nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations; recalcitrant carbon; spatial and temporal species distribution; pools and riffles; isotopes; leaf decomposition rates; land use; restoration; habitat complexity;

    Abstract : What will happen to ecosystems if species continue to go extinct at the high rates seen today? Although ecosystems are often threatened by a myriad of physical or chemical stressors, recent evidence has suggested that the loss of species may have impacts on the functions and services of ecosystems that equal or exceed other major environmental disturbances. The underlying causes that link species diversity to ecosystem functioning include species niche complementarity, facilitative interactions, or selection effects, which cause process rates to be enhanced in more diverse communities. READ MORE