Search for dissertations about: "Climate Justice"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 17 swedish dissertations containing the words Climate Justice.

  1. 1. Conditions of ‘Sustainability’ : The Case of Climate Change Adaptation in Sweden

    Author : David Olsson; Mikael Granberg; Line Säll; Stig Montin; Karlstads universitet; []
    Keywords : SOCIAL SCIENCES; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; climate change adaptation; resilience; vulnerability; sustainability; transformation; governing; policy analysis; Bacchi; WPR; discourse analysis; governmentality; political ecology; climate justice; phronesis; climate change; environmental politics; sustainable development; Statsvetenskap; Political Science;

    Abstract : By describing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of our time, the Swedish government has expressed a commitment to climate change adaptation as an integral part of the country’s sustainable development efforts. Sweden has also been portrayed as a frontrunner of climate policy and sustainable development. READ MORE

  2. 2. Global Warming and Our Natural Duties of Justice : A cosmopolitan political conception of justice

    Author : Aaron Maltais; Jörgen Hermansson; Ludvig Beckman; Edward Page; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : SOCIAL SCIENCES; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; Political science; Global warming; climate change; global justice; natural duties; political conception; contractualism; intergenerational; political duty; political authority; collective action; public goods; John Rawls; Thomas Nagel; Statsvetenskap; Political science; Statsvetenskap; Statskunskap; Political Science;

    Abstract : Compelling research in international relations and international political economy on global warming suggests that one part of any meaningful effort to radically reverse current trends of increasing green house gas (GHG) emissions is shared policies among states that generate costs for such emissions in many if not most of the world’s regions. Effectively employing such policies involves gaining much more extensive global commitments and developing much stronger compliance mechanism than those currently found in the Kyoto Protocol. READ MORE

  3. 3. Settling the Scales : Justice in International Environmental Negotiations and Beyond

    Author : Annkatrin Tritschoks; Ashok Swain; Kristine Höglund; Isak Svensson; Frank Dieter Grundig; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : SOCIAL SCIENCES; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; SOCIAL SCIENCES; chair; climate change; conflict resolution; Cyprus; environmental negotiations; international negotiations; justice; protracted social conflict; UNFCCC; Peace and Conflict Research; Freds- och konfliktforskning;

    Abstract : Parties to international negotiations typically invoke conflicting notions of justice. If these can be reconciled, this has positive effects on the negotiation process and outcome. If conflicts over justice persist, negotiations can stall or result in suboptimal outcomes. READ MORE

  4. 4. The Construction of a Sustainable Development in Times of Climate Change

    Author : Eric Brandstedt; Praktisk filosofi; []
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; sustainable development; climate justice; Climate change; needs; sufficientarianism; feasibility; constructivism; nonideal theory; limits;

    Abstract : This dissertation is a contribution to the debate about ‘climate justice’, i.e. a call for a just and feasible distribution of responsibility for addressing climate change. READ MORE

  5. 5. Climate Policy as a Window of Opportunity. Sweden and Global Climate Change

    Author : Mathias Zannakis; Göteborgs universitet; Göteborgs universitet; Gothenburg University; []
    Keywords : SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; climate policy; social dilemmas; social constructivism; discourse; story-line; norms; identity; legitimacy; ecological modernisation; environmental forerunner; Sweden;

    Abstract : Because of their social dilemma character, global environmental problems are difficult to successfully manage. States have few incentives to contribute to the common good because doing so would imply costs but not guarantee that others will contribute. Without a global government that can maintain order states do not want to act the sucker. READ MORE