Search for dissertations about: "Community conservation"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 68 swedish dissertations containing the words Community conservation.

  1. 1. Pastoralists, Mobility and Conservation : Shifting rules of access and control of grazing resources in Kenya's northern drylands

    Author : Annemiek Pas Schrijver; Lowe Börjeson; Elizabeth E. Watson; Mats Widgren; Caroline Upton; Stockholms universitet; []
    Keywords : SOCIAL SCIENCES; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; pastoralism; livestock mobility; conservation; community conservancy; Northern Rangelands Trust; political ecology; access; institutions; governmentality; territoriality; Samburu; Laikipia; Isiolo; Kenya; geografi med kulturgeografisk inriktning; Geography with Emphasis on Human Geography;

    Abstract : Pastoral mobility is seen as the most effective strategy to make use of constantly shifting resources. In northern Kenya, mobile pastoralism as a highly-valued strategy to manage grazing areas and exploit resource variability is becoming more complex. READ MORE

  2. 2. The Economics of Community-Based Wildlife Conservation in Zimbabwe

    Author : Edwin Muchapondwa; Göteborgs universitet; Göteborgs universitet; Gothenburg University; []
    Keywords : SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; bio-economic; CAMPFIRE; common property; community; design principles; dichotomous choice; diversification; elephant nuisance; institutions; insurance; poaching; risk management; simple spike; wildlife conservation; wildlife-livestock conflict;

    Abstract : This thesis deals with the economics of community-based wildlife conservation in Zimbabwe. It consists of an introductory chapter and four self-contained chapters. Chapter 1 spells out the history of wildlife conservation leading to the inception of CAMPFIRE. Research issues at the core of the rest of the thesis are also highlighted. READ MORE

  3. 3. Community Resettlement within the Context of Conservation and Development Projects : Implications on Livelihood Chances Among Rural inhabitants of Ikondokondo village in South West Cameroon

    Author : Frankline Ndi; Paul Hebinck; Netherlands Wageningen Italy; Wageningen University Pisa Slovakia; University of Pisa Nitra Germany; Slovak University of Agriculture Berlin France; Humboldt University of Berlin Rennes Belgium; Agro campus Ouest Ghent Ghent University International Master of Science in Rural Development; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; Community resettlement; Local people; Forest conservation; Livelihoods; Ikondokondo village; Cameroon;

    Abstract : In Cameroon the politics of forest resource governance stands asunder with the positive value of human activity within forest systems. This is partly due to the erroneous perception amongst policymakers and project planners that local peoples’ involvement in forest systems can only be detrimental. READ MORE

  4. 4. The Politics of People - Not Just Mangroves and Monkeys : A study of the theory and practice of community-based management of natural resources in Zanzibar

    Author : Fred Saunders; Björn Hassler; Vesa-Matti Loiske; Frances Cleaver; Södertörns högskola; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; SOCIAL SCIENCES; Actor-oriented theory; CBNRM; Community conservation; Conservation conflict; CPR theory; Environmental science; ICDP; Institutional theory; Mangroves; Participatory governance; Power; Zanzibar;

    Abstract : Community-based management of natural resource (CBNRM) projects have commonly failed to deliver conservation and development benefits. This thesis examined how the theoretical assumptions of common pool resource (CPR) theory have contributed to the indifferent performance of CBNRM projects. READ MORE

  5. 5. Community Robustness Analysis : Theoretical Approaches to Identifying Keystone Structures in Ecological Communities

    Author : Sofia Berg; Tomas Jonsson; Bo Ebenman; Daniel Stouffer; Linköpings universitet; []
    Keywords : ;

    Abstract : Most of the world’s ecosystems suffer from stress caused by human activities such as habitat destruction, fragmentation, overexploitation of species and climate change. These factors affect the reproduction and/or survival of individual species as well as interactions between species in ecological communities. READ MORE