Search for dissertations about: "John S Peel"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 8 swedish dissertations containing the words John S Peel.

  1. 1. Early Cambrian Problematic Lophotrochozoans and Dilemmas of Scleritome Reconstructions

    Author : Cecilia M Larsson; Lars E Holmer; Christian B Skovsted; Anette E S Högström; John S Peel; Glenn A Brock; Michael J Vendrasco; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURAL SCIENCES; Problematica; scleritome; Trachyplax; tommotiid; Cambrian; South Australia; North Greenland; Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology; Geovetenskap med inriktning mot historisk geologi och paleontologi;

    Abstract : The emergence and radiation of metazoan body plans around the Precambrian/Cambrian boundary, some 500-600 million years ago, seems to be concordant with the appearance and diversification of preservable hard parts. Several Precambrian soft-bodied, multicellular organisms most likely represent stem-group bilaterians, but their fossil record is rather sparse. READ MORE

  2. 2. Cambro-Ordovician microorganisms: acritarchs and endoliths

    Author : Martin Stockfors; Malgorzata Vidal-Moczydlowska; John S. Peel; Kenneth John Dorning; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; Earth sciences; Cambrian; Ordovician; acritarch; endolith; Kolguev Island; North Greenland; Stratigraphy; Geovetenskap; Earth sciences; Geovetenskap;

    Abstract : Organic-walled microfossils are abundant and taxonomically diverse in Cambrian-Ordovician strata; some are important for biostratigraphy and for the correlation of geological successions. New assemblages of Cambrian-Ordovician acritarchs from Kolguev Island, Arctic Russia and Middle Cambrian ichnofossils of endoliths from Peary Land, North Greenland are studied. READ MORE

  3. 3. Functional Morphology of Gastropods and Bivalves

    Author : Jenny Sälgeback; Lars Holmer; John S. Peel; Jan-Ove Ebbestad; Enrico Savazzi; Anders Warén; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : Earth sciences; Gastropoda; Bivalvia; functional morphology; constructional morphology; Geovetenskap;

    Abstract : Functional morphology analyzes the relationships between form and function in organisms. However, a comprehensive analysis of any organic structure requires an integrated approach to morphology. For this purpose constructional morphology was developed, where function, phylogeny and construction together explain form. READ MORE

  4. 4. Ordovician (Billingen and Volkhov stages) Brachiopod Faunas of the East Baltic

    Author : Eva Egerquist; Lars Holmer; John S. Peel; Michael G. Bassett; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; Earth sciences; Early Middle Ordovician; Billingen Regional Stage; Volkhov Regional Stage; Diversity; Brachiopoda; Conodonta; Ostracoda; Estonia; Russia; Geovetenskap; Earth sciences; Geovetenskap;

    Abstract : Lower-Middle Ordovician (Arenig) successions in the East Baltic have been investigated for more than one hundred and fifty years. Nevertheless detailed sampling still yields new species and better knowledge of the environment in which these organisms lived. READ MORE

  5. 5. The Arthropod Assemblage of the Upper Devonian Strud locality and its Ecology

    Author : Linda Lagebro; Graham E. Budd; Gregory D. Edgecombe; John S. Peel; Gerhard Scholtz; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : Branchiopoda; Hexapoda; Eurypterida; Strud; Famennian; ephemeral pool; Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology; Geovetenskap med inriktning mot historisk geologi och paleontologi;

    Abstract : The Devonian (419-359 million years ago) is the geological period when the terrestrial biota fully established. Early representatives from a terrestrial and continental aquatic biota have previously been reported from the Upper Devonian (Famennian) Strud quarry in Belgium, in the shape of seed-bearing plants and vertebrates (fish and early tetrapods). READ MORE