Search for dissertations about: "Malaria africa"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 62 swedish dissertations containing the words Malaria africa.

  1. 1. Malaria and relapsing fever Borrelia : interactions and potential therapy

    Author : Jenny Lundqvist; Cathrine Persson; Antonio Barragan; Umeå universitet; []
    Keywords : MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; Malaria; Plasmodium; relapsing fever; Borrelia; persistent; concomitant infections; polyamines; Molecular biology; Molekylärbiologi; Microbiology; immunology; infectious diseases; Mikrobiologi; immunologi; infektionssjukdomar; molekylär bioteknik inst f molekylärbiologi ; molecular biotechnology dept of molecular biology ; Infectious Diseases; infektionssjukdomar;

    Abstract : Infectious diseases such as malaria and relapsing fever borreliosis (RF), cause severe human mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Malaria, caused by Plasmodium spp. parasites, is estimated by the World Health Organization to cause 1.5-2. READ MORE

  2. 2. Polyamine Pathway as Drug Target against Malaria

    Author : Janina Sprenger; Biogena aminer; []
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; Amino acid insertions; Crystallography; polyamine pathway; drug design; enzyme inhibition; ITC; ligand binding; malaria; Plasmodium falciparum; S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase; spermidine synthase.;

    Abstract : Malaria, caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for about 600.000 death cases every year. Mainly affected are populations of subtropical countries in Africa and the largest groups of victims are children below the age of 5 years. READ MORE

  3. 3. Host responses to malaria and bacterial co-­infections

    Author : Maria Nelson; Johan Normark; Sven Bergström; Anna Fahlgren; Olle Stendahl; Umeå universitet; []
    Keywords : MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; Plasmodium; Malaria; Borrelia; S. pneumoniae; Co-infection; Immunology; Metabolomics;

    Abstract : The two main causes of child mortality and morbidity in Africa are malaria and invasive bacterial diseases. In addition, co-infections in sub-Saharan Africa are the rule rather than the exception. However, not much is known about the host-pathogen interaction during a concomitant infection or how it affects the outcome of disease. READ MORE

  4. 4. Towards Climate Based Early Warning and Response Systems for Malaria

    Author : Maquins Odhiambo Sewe; Joacim Rocklöv; Clas Ahlm; Yesim Tozan; Madeleine Thomson; Umeå universitet; []
    Keywords : MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; Malaria; Mosquito; Lead time; Early Warnings; Forecasts; Economic Evaluation; Rainfall; KEMRI CDC HDSS; Kenya; Temperature; LST; NDVI; Climate; HDSS; GAM; GAMBOOST; DLNM; Remote Sensing; Net Benefit; Cost-Effectiveness; Boosting Regression; Weather; Public Health; Infectious Diseases; folkhälsa; Public health; Epidemiology; epidemiologi;

    Abstract : Background: Great strides have been made in combating malaria, however, the indicators in sub Saharan Africa still do not show promise for elimination in the near future as malaria infections still result in high morbidity and mortality among children. The abundance of the malaria-transmitting mosquito vectors in these regions are driven by climate suitability. READ MORE

  5. 5. Oviposition cues as a tool for developing a new malaria control strategy

    Author : Lynda Eneh; Anna-Karin Borg-Karlson; Willem Takken; KTH; []
    Keywords : Anopheles gambiae; Malaria; Oviposition; Volatile compounds; GC-MS; DGGE; Sorption; Fungi; Bacteria; Physicochemical parameters; Nut grass; Bermuda grass; Anopheles gambiae; Malaria; Äggläggning; Flyktiga ämnen; GC-MS; DGGE; Sorptionen; Svampar; Bakterier; Gräs; Kemi; Chemistry;

    Abstract : Anopheles gambiae sensu lato mosquitoes are among the dominant malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa. However, not much is known about the oviposition behaviour of these species necessary for the development of malaria vector control strategies. READ MORE