Search for dissertations about: "Microbial growth"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 188 swedish dissertations containing the words Microbial growth.

  1. 1. Soil salinity as a driver of microbial community structure and functioning

    University dissertation from Lund University, Faculty of Science, Centre for Environmental and Climate Research (CEC)

    Author : Kristin Rath; [2017-12]
    Keywords : NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; Soil salinization; Soil Microbiology; soil microbial community; Bacteria; Aerobic; Fungi; Drying-rewetting; Microbial growth; Microbial biomass; Soil respiration; salinity tolerance; Saline soils; Salinity gradient;

    Abstract : Soil salinization is a pressing agricultural problem in many areas of the world, particularly in areas heavily reliant on irrigation agriculture. While the negative effects of salinity on crop plants have been widely studied, its effects on soil microorganisms have received less attention, and the impact of soil salinity on both microbial community structure and functioning is not well understood. READ MORE

  2. 2. Wastewater treatment and biomass generation by Nordic microalgae growth in subarctic climate and microbial interactions

    University dissertation from Umeå : Umeå University

    Author : Lorenza Ferro; Christiane Funk; Francesco Gentili; Luísa Gouveia; [2019]
    Keywords : NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; Microalgae; Wastewater; Nitrogen; Phosphate; Biomass; Lipids; Subarctic Climate; Light; Temperature; Bacteria; Photoautotrophy; Heterotrophy; Mixotrophy; HRAP; Metabarcoding; Microbial Communities; Alpha-diversity; Environmental Factors; Biochemistry; biokemi; mikrobiologi; Microbiology;

    Abstract : Nordic native microalgal strains were isolated, genetically classified and tested for their ability to grow in municipal wastewater. Eight of the isolated strains could efficiently remove nitrogen and phosphate in less than two weeks. Two of these strains, Coelastrella sp. READ MORE

  3. 3. Soil microbial responses to mild winters and seasonal change

    University dissertation from Lund University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology

    Author : Johanna Birgander; [2017-05]
    Keywords : NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi AMF ; RESPIRATION; Stable isotope; Fungal growth; PLFA; NLFA; Microbial community composition; bacterial growth; Aboveground-belowground interactions; Temperature adaptation; Climate change;

    Abstract : The aim with this thesis work was to study microorganisms response to milder winters, different seasons, and altered temperature. Winter warming treatments were established in a semi-natural temperate grassland, simulating mild winters for two years. READ MORE

  4. 4. Phosphorus availability and microbial respiration across biomes  from plantation forest to tundra

    University dissertation from Umeå : Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap

    Author : Camilla Esberg; Reiner Giesler; David A. Wardle; Bente J. Graae; Dan Binkley; [2010]
    Keywords : phosphorus availability; microbial bioassay; soil respiration; microbial growth rate; Hedley fractionation; soil sorption; weathered soils; boreal forest; subarctic and tundra;

    Abstract : Phosphorus is the main limiting nutrient for plant growth in large areas of the world and the availability of phosphorus to plants and microbes can be strongly affected by soil properties. Even though the phosphorus cycle has been studied extensively, much remains unknown about the key processes governing phosphorus availability in different environments. READ MORE

  5. 5. Microbial mobilization and immobilization of soil nitrogen

    University dissertation from Per Bengtson, Ekologihuset, 223 62 Lund

    Author : Per Bengtson; [2004]
    Keywords : NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; Ecology; Ekologi; growth rate; microbial activity; respiration; assimilation; immobilization; Nitrogen; mineralization;

    Abstract : Microorganisms in forest ecosystems normally recycle nitrogen (N), such that gaseous losses and leaching are limited. Mobilization of organic N, including microbial N, and immobilization of inorganic N, especially NH4+, are the quantitatively most important N transformation processes. Various factors influence their rates, e.g. READ MORE