Search for dissertations about: "NATURAL SCIENCES Physics Geocosmophysics and plasma physics Space physics"

Found 2 swedish dissertations containing the words NATURAL SCIENCES Physics Geocosmophysics and plasma physics Space physics.

  1. 1. Solitary waves and enhanced incoherent scatter ion lines

    Author : Jonas Ekeberg; Lars Eliasson; Kristof Stasiewicz; Jan Trulsen; Umeå universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; plasma waves and instabilities; nonlinear phenomena; solitons and solitary waves; ionosphere; Sun: corona; incoherent scatter radar; MHD; plasmavågor och instabiliteter; ickelinjära fenomen; solitoner och solitära vågor; jonosfär; solen: korona; inkoherent spridningsradar; MHD; Geocosmophysics and plasma physics; Geokosmofysik och plasmafysik; Space physics; Rymdfysik; Plasma physics; Plasmafysik; Non-linear dynamics; chaos; Icke-linjär dynamik; kaos; fysik; Physics; rymd- och plasmafysik; Space and Plasma Physics;

    Abstract : This thesis addresses solitary waves and their significance for auroral particle acceleration, coronal heating and incoherent scatter radar spectra. Solitary waves are formed due to a balance of nonlinear and dispersive effects. READ MORE

  2. 2. Low-Energy Ion Escape from the Terrestrial Polar Regions

    Author : Erik Engwall; Anders I. Eriksson; Mats André; Thomas Moore; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : NATURAL SCIENCES; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; space physics; ion outflow; polar wind; auroral upflows; atmospheric escape; magnetotail lobes; spacecraft wake; electric field measurements; Geocosmophysics and plasma physics; Geokosmofysik och plasmafysik; Space and Plasma Physics; rymd- och plasmafysik;

    Abstract : The contemporary terrestrial atmosphere loses matter at a rate of around 100,000 tons per year. A major fraction of the net mass loss is constituted by ions, mainly H+ and O+, which escape from the Earth’s ionosphere in the polar regions. READ MORE