Search for dissertations about: "Slavic Languages"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 37 swedish dissertations containing the words Slavic Languages.

  1. 1. From Her Point of View : Woman's Anti-World in the Poetry of Anna Świrszczyńska

    Author : Renata Ingbrant; Leonard Neuger; Ebba Witt-Brattström; Ewa Kraskowska; Stockholms universitet; []
    Keywords : HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; the grotesque; ekphrastic poetry; the Warsaw Uprising; poetry of witness; the city lament; studium and punctum; the abject abjection; body-soul dualism; Świrszczyńska Swir; Miłosz; Slavic languages; Slaviska språk; slaviska språk; Slavic Languages;

    Abstract : This book is a monograph about Anna Świrszczyńska’s poetry. It may be described as one woman’s attempt to read another woman’s literary work by taking into account established canons as well as the tools of feminist literary analysis. Part One begins with a discussion of Świrszczyńska’s biography (Chapter One). READ MORE

  2. 2. Linguistic Images of Emotions in Translation from Polish into Swedish : Henryk Sienkiewicz as a Case in Point

    Author : Ewa Gruszczyńska; Witold Maciejewski; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; Slavic and Baltic languages - general; dative; emotion; expressive derivative; interjection; Polish; translation strategies; Sienkiewicz; Swedish; Slaviska och baltiska språk - allmänt; Slavic languages; Slaviska språk; slaviska språk; Slavic Languages;

    Abstract : The purpose of this study is to investigate differences in manifesting emotions in the Polish writer Henryk Sienkiewicz's texts and their Swedish translations, as well as the translation strategies used in this area. The empirical base material for the dissertation consists of three short stories (Janko Muzykant, Jamioł, Bądź błogosławiona) and one novel (Ogniem i mieczem). READ MORE

  3. 3. The Spirit of Revolt : Nikolai Berdiaev's Existential Gnosticism

    Author : Fabian Linde; Per-Arne Bodin; Elena Namli; Irene Masing-Delic; Stockholms universitet; []
    Keywords : HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; Russian philosophy; Berdyaev; Berdiaev; Hans Jonas; Russian religious philosophy; gnosticism; gnosis; existentialism; gnostic return; Slavic languages; Slaviska språk; slaviska språk; Slavic Languages;

    Abstract : This thesis is a study of the Russian religious philosopher Nikolai Berdiaev (1874-1948). The aim of the thesis is to re-examine the alleged gnostic subtext in Berdiaev’s thought by exploring a number of interrelated motifs in his world outlook, teaching on man and theory of knowledge. READ MORE

  4. 4. Implicit and explicit norm in contemporary Russian verbal stress

    Author : Elisabeth Marklund Sharapova; Sven Gustavsson; Ludmila Ferm; Lars Steensland; Uppsala universitet; []
    Keywords : HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; Slavic and Baltic languages - general; language norm; implicit norm; explicit norm; language normativisation; language normalisation; codification; Russian; stress; verbal stress; accentology; orthoepy; Slaviska och baltiska språk - allmänt; Slavic languages; Slaviska språk; Slaviska språk; Slavic Languages;

    Abstract : The purpose of this thesis is to investigate norm in contemporary Russian verbal stress. In a first step the concept of norm is explored. It is shown that the criteria generally used in Russian for defining norm (correspondence to the language system, usage and authority/tradition/necessity) are not applied strictly. READ MORE

  5. 5. The Rhetoric of Pravda Editorials : A Diachronic Study of a Political Genre

    Author : Ludmila Pöppel; Milan Bily; Anatolii Shaikevich; Dmitrii Dobrovolskii; Stockholms universitet; []
    Keywords : HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; political discourse; discourse analysis; language of revolution; totalitarian language; Soviet political language; Pravda editorials; rhetorical changes; Slavic languages; Slaviska språk; slaviska språk; Slavic Languages;

    Abstract : The present study considers the diachronic changes that took place in Soviet political discourse as reflected in six selections of Pravda editorials from the 1920s through the 1950s, as well as slogans and headlines in that newspaper from 1917 through 1933. The principal goal of analyses conducted on various levels is to identify and investigate a number of tendencies demonstrating the gradual transformation of the language of revolution into totalitarian language. READ MORE