Search for dissertations about: "adult survivors"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 33 swedish dissertations containing the words adult survivors.

  1. 1. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Late effects in young adult survivors

    Author : Marianne Jarfelt; Göteborgs universitet.; Gothenburg University.; [2006]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; adult survivor; GH secretion; body composition; bone mineral density; exercise echocardiography;

    Abstract : Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. The 5-year survival rate has gradually increased from 5% in early 1970s to over 80% today. Until now most patients have been discharged from further follow up after puberty. READ MORE

  2. 2. Childhood brain tumours : Health and function in adult survivors and parental fears

    University dissertation from Stockholm : Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women's and Children's Health

    Author : Malin Anclair; Karolinska Institutet.; Karolinska Institutet.; [2009]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; Childhood brain tumours; adult survivors; health-related late effects; parental fears;

    Abstract : The general aim of the present research was to investigate health and functional ability of patients treated for childhood brain tumour and systematically examine parental fears after a child s brain tumour. The aims were realised through two part-studies. READ MORE

  3. 3. CNS tumours of childhood/adolescence : outcomes related to disability and identity in adult survivors

    University dissertation from Stockholm : Karolinska Institutet, Dept of Women's and Children's Health

    Author : Lina Hörnquist; Karolinska Institutet.; Karolinska Institutet.; [2017]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES;

    Abstract : Central nervous system (CNS) tumour survivors are at increased risk for adverse health and functional late effects. Results from previous studies from the Swedish LIFE project, of which this licentiate thesis is a part, indicate needs of expanded clinical surveillance, and long-term follow-up in order to reduce late effects and protect quality of survival. READ MORE

  4. 4. Childhood CNS tumours : Health and functional outcomes in adult survivors, and follow-up needs of patients and parents

    University dissertation from Stockholm : Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women's and Children's Health

    Author : Emma Hovén; Karolinska Institutet.; Karolinska Institutet.; [2010]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; Childhood CNS tumours; adult survivors; health-related late effects; functional disability; long-term follow up; parental distress; persistent family impact;

    Abstract : Childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumour patients represent a high-risk population regarding tumour- and treatment-related late effects. The overall purpose of the present thesis was to gain increased knowledge about the long-term consequences for survivors and their parents after a CNS tumour diagnosis in childhood. READ MORE

  5. 5. Life-course influences on occurrence and outcome for stroke and coronary heart disease

    University dissertation from Örebro : Örebro University

    Author : Cecilia Bergh; Scott Montgomery; Katja Fall; Ylva Nilsagård; Peter Appelros; Meena Kumari; [2017]
    Keywords : MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP; MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES; cardiovascular disease; stroke; risk factors; adolescence; stress resilience; adult infections; life-course epidemiology; cohort study;

    Abstract : Although typical clinical onset does not occur until adulthood, cardiovascular disease (CVD) may have a long natural history with accumulation of risks beginning in early life and continuing through childhood and into adolescence and adulthood. Therefore, it is important to adopt a life-course approach to explore accumulation of risks, as well as identifying age-defined windows of susceptibility, from early life to disease onset. READ MORE