Search for dissertations about: "markedness"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 8 swedish dissertations containing the word markedness.

  1. 1. A parametric grammar of Seediq

    Author : Arthur Holmer; [1996]
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; Austronesian; Atayalic; Formosan; Seediq; Sediq; subject-focus; Taiwan; Linguistics; Lingvistik; template; autosegmental phonology; morphophonology; markedness; morphology; word order; parametric variation; Case-theory; syntax; GB theory; voice; agreement; parameters;

    Abstract : Seediq is an Austronesian language spoken in Taiwan. It has several characteristics which are typologically unusual but typical for Austronesian languages. VOS word order, subject-focus (i.e. READ MORE

  2. 2. The transience of American Swedish

    University dissertation from Lund University Press

    Author : Staffan Klintborg; [1999]
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; transfer; pragmatic markers; nonce-borrowing; markedness; language loss; language death; language attrition; language alternation; divergence; convergence; continuum; contact linguistics; codeswitching; avoidance; American Swedish; automaticity; triggering; English language and literature; Engelska språk och litteratur ;

    Abstract : This thesis concerns two languages in contact: English and Swedish. It is based on interviews with Swedes who came to North America with the last major wave of emigration. READ MORE

  3. 3. Agreement with Collective Nouns in English

    University dissertation from Lund University Press

    Author : Magnus Levin; [2001]
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; markedness; Longman Spoken American Corpus; grammatical change; corpus; conventionalization; concord; conceptualization; collective nouns; British National Corpus; British English; BNC; Australian English; American English; agreement; Agreement Hierarchy; pronouns; English language and literature; Engelska språk och litteratur ; Grammar; semantics; semiotics; syntax; Grammatik; semantik; semiotik;

    Abstract : This thesis concerns agreement with collective nouns in American, British and Australian English. It is based on material from newspaper corpora and spoken corpora. The findings suggest that dialectal, stylistic, diachronic, syntactic and semantic factors interact in the selection of singular and plural agreement. READ MORE

  4. 4. Source Language of Lexical Transfer in Multilingual Learners A Mixed Methods Approach

    University dissertation from Stockholm : Department of English, Stockholm University

    Author : Hannah Neuser; Maria Kuteeva; Philip Shaw; Camilla Bardel; Scott Jarvis; [2017]
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; multilingualism; third language acquisition; lexical transfer; crosslinguistic influence; modal differences; proficiency; recency; exposure; psychotypology; L2 status; transferability; markedness; lexical organization; activation; lexical access; English; engelska;

    Abstract : The study reported in this thesis investigates the source language of lexical transfer in multilingual learners using a mixed methods approach. Previous research has shown that the source language of crosslinguistic influence can be related to factors such as proficiency, recency/exposure, psychotypology, the L2 status, and item-specific transferability. READ MORE

  5. 5. English Colour Terms in Context

    University dissertation from Umeå : Umeå universitet

    Author : Anders Steinvall; Gunnar Persson; [2002]
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; English language; basic colour terms; elaborate colour terms; cognitive linguistics; metonymy; domain; context; markedness; figurative meaning; type modification; classifying function; vantage; reference point; attribute; entrenchment; radial category; corpus; HUMANITIES and RELIGION Languages and linguistics Other Germanic languages English language; HUMANIORA och RELIGIONSVETENSKAP Språkvetenskap Övriga germanska språk Engelska språket; engelska; English;

    Abstract : This thesis examines usage of English colour terms in context, based on an extensive computerised text corpus, the Bank of English. It describes the ways in which English colour terms may be used to refer to nuances outside their normal area of designation and to attributes outside the colour domain. READ MORE