Search for dissertations about: "tidigmodern historia"

Found 2 swedish dissertations containing the words tidigmodern historia.

  1. 1. The Old, the New and the Unknown : The continents and the making of geographical knowledge in seventeenth-century Sweden

    University dissertation from Turku (Åbo), Finland : Iloinen tiede

    Author : Charlotta Forss; Stockholms universitet.; [2018]
    Keywords : HUMANIORA; HUMANITIES; historical geography; Ottoman Empire; colonial America; conceptual history; history of knowledge; history of cartography; history of science; religious geography; early modern history; historisk geografi; kartografi; begreppshistoria; kunskapshistoria; Osmanska riket; vetenskapshistoria; religiös geografi; tidigmodern historia; det koloniala Amerika; historia; History;

    Abstract : This thesis investigates early modern ways of looking at the world through an analysis of what the continents meant in three settings of knowledge making in seventeenth-century Sweden. Combining text, maps and images, the thesis analyses the meaning of the continents in, first, early modern scholarly ‘geography’, second, accounts of journeys to the Ottoman Empire and, third, accounts of journeys to the colony New Sweden. READ MORE

  2. 2. The Money of Monarchs : The Importance of Non-Tax Revenue for Autocratic Rule in Early Modern Sweden

    University dissertation from Lund University

    Author : Klas Nilsson; Lund University.; Lunds universitet.; [2017]
    Keywords : SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; revenue; autocracy; regime change; fiscal sociology; public finance; state-building; Sweden; Early Modern Europe; Rentier State; royal power; statsinkomster; statsstyre; politisk utveckling; Rentier State; Rentierism; skattesystem; tidigmodern statsbildning; Sverige; europeisk historia;

    Abstract : According to a venerable argument about the formation of political regimes in historical Europe, taxation goes hand in hand with representation, as financial needs forced rulers to trade rights for revenue. In this dissertation I explore the reverse assumption, asking whether it is the case that non-taxation went hand in hand with non-representation? I argue that early modern rulers who had access to what I conceptualize as ‘proprietary revenue’—including profits from landownership, natural resource extraction, state-owned enterprise, and colonial plunder—could use such revenue to concentrate political authority in their own hands and rule as autocrats. READ MORE