Search for dissertations about: "water rights"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 21 swedish dissertations containing the words water rights.

  1. 1. Access to water Rights, obligations and the Bangalore situation

    University dissertation from Linköping : Linköping University Electronic Press

    Author : Jenny T. Grönwall; Johan Hedrén; Julie Wilk; Srinivasan Janakarajan; [2008]
    Keywords : NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; access to water; rights; human rights; water rights; India; Bangalore; tillgång till vatten; rättigheter; mänskliga rättigheter; vattenrättigheter; Indien; Bangalore; INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AREAS Water in nature and society; TVÄRVETENSKAPLIGA FORSKNINGSOMRÅDEN Vatten i natur och samhälle;

    Abstract : The city of Bangalore in southern India is undergoing rapid urbanisation and administrative transition. Its growth puts pressure on the available water sources – being mainly the disputed inter-State River Cauvery and the hard-rock aquifers – with ensuing problems of access. READ MORE

  2. 2. Managing agricultural nutrient leaching within the EC Water Framework Directive in Sweden

    University dissertation from Linköping : Linköping University Electronic Press

    Author : Anna-Lena Bratt; Linköpings universitet.; Linköpings universitet.; [2003]
    Keywords : NATURVETENSKAP; NATURAL SCIENCES; nutrient leaching; agricultural pollution; C Water Framework Directive; water quality; legislation; övergödning; lantbruk; INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AREAS Water in nature and society; TVÄRVETENSKAPLIGA FORSKNINGSOMRÅDEN Vatten i natur och samhälle;

    Abstract : Agricultural management practices geared towards reducing nutrient leaching are in focus for the research presented in this thesis. Critical measures for reducing diffuse pollution from the agricultural sector depend on decisions of individual farmers. READ MORE

  3. 3. To Have and to Hold: Continuity and change in property rights institutions governing water resources among the Meru of Tanzania and the BaKgatla in Botswana; 1925-2000

    University dissertation from Almqvist & Wiksell International

    Author : Ellen Hillbom; Lund University.; Lunds universitet.; [2003]
    Keywords : SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; institutional change; Botswana; institutions; Kgatleng; Meru; natural resources; property rights; Tanzania; Sub-Saharan Africa; water; Social and economic history; Ekonomisk och social historia;

    Abstract : Allocation, control, and management of natural resources are issues that absorb researchers within both the social and natural sciences. This study deals with such research questions as well as with one of the most fundamental issues in Economic History – namely institutional change. READ MORE

  4. 4. Who cares about water? : A study of household water development in Sukumaland, Tanzania

    University dissertation from Linköping : Linköpings universitet

    Author : Jan-Olof Drangert; Linköpings universitet.; Linköpings universitet.; [1993]
    Keywords : SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AREAS; TVÄRVETENSKAPLIGA FORSKNINGSOMRÅDEN;

    Abstract : This is a study of the incentives and constraints which bear upon people's ability to improve access to and quality of household water through their own cooperative and household efforts. The focus is on activities that are managed and controlled in the community and involve human and physical resources. READ MORE

  5. 5. Thirsting for Credible Commitments. How Secure Land Tenure Affects Access to Drinking Water in sub-Saharan Africa

    University dissertation from Göteborg : University of Gothenburg

    Author : Martin Sjöstedt; Göteborgs universitet.; Gothenburg University.; [2008]
    Keywords : SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP; SOCIAL SCIENCES; property rights; land tenure; water; credible commitments; history of play; tying the grabbing hand; sub-Saharan Africa; institutions;

    Abstract : Abstract The argument developed in this dissertation contends that access to drinking water is closely related to the institutional arrangements under which land is managed. However, while previous research goes astray in definitional debates over which form of land tenure – customary systems, state control, or private titles – best promotes increased water coverage levels, the argument here is that to be truly secure and stimulate citizen investments – in for example water infrastructure, wells, and housing – land tenure needs the backing of a credible governmental commitment. READ MORE